Heartfield Famous Advertising Graphic Design: Weimar Republic Books

CLICK ARROWS TO THE RIGHT OF AUTHOR’S NAME FOR DESCRIPTION
For Kurt Tucholsky

For Kurt Tucholsky

Heartfield's famous advertising graphic design for Kurt Tucholsky's brilliant novel Deutschland, Deutschland, über alles, 1929. Tucholsky skewered the German Weimar Republic bourgeois society .

For Kurt Tucholsky

For Kurt Tucholsky

Heartfield's historic advertising graphic design for Kurt Tucholsky's brilliant novel Deutschland, Deutschland, über alles, 1929. Tucholsky's novel satirizing the bourgeoisie became an instant success in the German Weimar Republic.

For Upton Sinclair

For Upton Sinclair

Heartfield's famous advertising graphic design for the Upton Sinclair novel Nach der Sintflut. The graphic is Heartfield's futuristic vision of the destructive power of global warming.

The waves crashing over the skyscraper echo a Mutt and Jeff cartoon of a skyscraper rising from the ocean.

For Upton Sinclair

For Upton Sinclair

Heartfield's famous advertising graphic design for Upton Sinclair's Roman eines Patrioten. Heartfield used his invention of a 3D book jacket that told a story from the front cover of the book to the back cover with devastating effect.

For F.C. Weiscopf

For F.C. Weiscopf

Heartfield's famous advertising graphic design for F.C. Weiscopf's Were keine Wahl hat, hat die Qual (If There Is No Choice, There Is Suffering).


Where will workers go when the machines take their jobs?



“Heartfield
Political Art Upton Sinclair Book Cover by John Heartfield

A Heartfield Wraparound Book Cover for Upton Sinclair

Heartfield political art graphic design for Upton Sinclair

Introduction Heartfield’s Groundbreaking Advertising Graphic Design

Excerpt From Nancy Roth’s 1993 Essay:
Heartfield and Modern Art
[ Even before he was known as a master of satirical political art ] … Heartfield’s reputation grew quickly during the 1920’s, though less as a political activist or as a fine artist than as a graphic designer.
 
His notable design innovations moved in a discernible direction towards a combination of photographs, text, and color that abruptly switches the expected meaning of each separate element and yields a new meaning.
 
He is credited, for example, with the introduction of a book jacket conceived as a three-dimensional object, its two surfaces bearing related images that together convey an abstract idea central to the book in question.”



For an excellent introduction to Heartfield’s graphic design, read Maud Lavin’s Heartfield In Context in the HIDDEN GENIUS section of the exhibition.

New works of political art will always be added.
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